Hawaii Pacific Health is working with the Hawaii Department of Health to administer the COVID-19 Vaccine and protect you and your loved ones.

We are currently scheduling appointments for individuals ages 5 and older.

Covid 19 Vaccine Update

What You Need To Know About The COVID-19 Vaccine Program

With the COVID-19 vaccination program, hope and optimism have returned. While our goal is to get “shots in arms”, we know you may have questions. The following video provides an overview of how the vaccines work, the different types of vaccines, some of the side effects and just how getting vaccinated benefits you and our society. If you have any questions or concerns about getting the vaccine, you are encouraged to watch the video here.

You can self-schedule your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at any one of our locations below. Your second dose will be scheduled at the time you receive your first dose.

For individuals interested in getting a third dose of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine, the CDC is currently recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised people receive an additional dose of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine, which include Pfizer or Moderna. For more details on the CDC guidance on who needs an additional or third COVID-19 mRNA vaccination, please go to our COVID-19 Vaccine Third Dose Questions located here.

Mobile Vaccine Clinic

Oahu Private Vaccination Events

Schedule an Appointment on Oahu

Hawaii residents 5 years of age and older, may self-schedule below for an Oahu Private Vaccination Event.

These are PRIVATE vaccine events. The general public is not allowed and the events may NOT be shared with individuals who are not affiliated with these sites.

Please select your location:


I want to make a Vaccine Appointment for:




Appointments are required for first doses for minors (ages 5-17) and third doses for those who are eligible (booster shots and third doses for immunocompromised).

Walk-ins are welcome and appointments are available for first doses for adults (ages 18+).

Hawaii Pacific Health provides Pfizer (for ages 5+) and Moderna (for ages 18+) vaccines.

For children ages 5-17, a parent or legal guardian must complete the CDC Prevaccination Checklist AND Department of Education Student Vaccination Consent Form and have the child bring it to the vaccination appointment. These forms may be found via the button below and are included as part of the online registration process when scheduling an appointment, or may also be distributed by the child's school as part of any vaccination information materials provided.

Important Reminders
Only one appointment per qualified individual is allowed.

Preparing for Your Mobile Vaccine Clinic Appointment

What to Bring

  • Photo ID and insurance card, if you have one.
  • For second and third doses, bring your CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card that was provided to you at your first appointment.
  • Face masks must be worn at all times.
Print Checklist

What to Expect During Your Appointment

For your safety and well-being, you will be monitored for any side effects by medical personnel for a minimum of 15 minutes after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.

Before you leave, you will be asked to schedule your follow-up appointment for your second dose.

Please note that everyone entering the clinic must wear a mask and practice appropriate social distancing.

COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

Find the latest updates and answers to frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 vaccine here. If your question is not answered below, there are links provided at the end of the FAQ section to additional resources for more information about the vaccine.

Vaccine Appointment Questions

Can anyone get the vaccine?

Hawaii Pacific Health is following the state’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan and federal government mandates for distribution of the vaccine to priority groups based on their risk of exposure. We started with Phase 1a of the plan, which includes health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities. We are currently vaccinating Oahu residents who are 12 and older. For appointments at our Kapiolani Medical Center for Women & Children Vaccine Clinic, minors ages 12 to 17 years old must be accompanied to their appointment by a parent or guardian. For appointments at our mobile vaccine clinic locations on Oahu, parents or guardians of students receiving their vaccine at a Department of Education site, ages 12-17, who will not be accompanying students for their scheduled appointment must complete the Department of Education vaccination consent form available on the HPH scheduling webpage and have their child bring it with them to their appointment.

How can I schedule my appointment?

If you are in the eligible population for the COVID-19 vaccine, you can make an appointment online at HawaiiPacificHealth.org/COVID19Vaccine.

How can I sign up for MyChart for my COVID-19 vaccine appointment?

If you have received any healthcare services at a Hawaii Pacific Health facility, you can go to MyChart.HawaiiPacificHealth.org/Signup to request an activation code. If your personal information can be verified with the information on file at Hawaii Pacific Health, you will receive an activation code by email to open your MyChart account. If the information entered doesn’t match, an email will be sent to you saying we are unable to issue an access code. This is a safety measure to protect your personal health information. If this occurs, please request an appointment on our website at HawaiiPacificHealth.org/COVID19Vaccine.

Someone called me to schedule my appointment. How do I call them back?

At this time, the representative will attempt another call. Please check your email that was used when signing up online. Representatives are assisting people in the order the appointment requests were received.

I received a message in MyChart regarding my vaccination appointment. Can I follow up with them via phone?

The best way to respond is via MyChart message.

Can I bring someone with me to the appointment?

If you require assistance, you may bring one person with you to escort you for your vaccination appointment. This person must be 18 years of age or older.

How early should I arrive for my appointment?

Please arrive no earlier than 5 minutes before your scheduled appointment. Patients who arrive earlier than that will be asked to come back closer to their appointment time.

How long will the vaccination take?

On average, you can expect your appointment to last between 30-45 minutes. For your safety and well-being, you will be monitored for any side effects by medical personnel for a minimum of 15 minutes after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. At that time, you will also be given a questionnaire to fill out with contact information. Before you leave, you will also be asked to schedule your follow-up appointment for your second dose.

What should I bring with me to my appointment?

Please wear a mask when you arrive for your appointment. You’ll also need to bring a photo I.D. like a driver’s license or State I.D., your medical insurance card, your printed and completed questionnaire and your appointment confirmation email, either printed out or on a digital device like your phone.

I scheduled my appointment but didn’t receive a confirmation. What should I do?

If you tried to create an appointment via HawaiiPacificHealth.org/COVID19Vaccine and did not receive a confirmation screen, please start a new session. A confirmation page with the details of the appointment is proof that the appointment was scheduled online successfully.

I have a confirmed appointment for my vaccine. Can I reschedule to a different day and time?

We encourage you to keep your scheduled appointment as is. If you are unable to keep your appointment, log into your MyChart account and reschedule within MyChart. If you don’t have a MyChart account, please Click Here and complete the information regarding your confirmed appointment, a representative will contact you to reschedule your appointment.

Which vaccine is HPH administering - Pfizer, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson?

HPH will administer vaccines that are provided by the Hawai‘i Department of Health. At the Kapiolani Medical Center for Women & Children Vaccine Clinic, patients have a choice between the Moderna, Pfizer or Johnson & Johnson vaccine upon arrival. The mobile vaccination bus is currently providing the Pfizer vaccine for those 12 years of age or older, and the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for those 18 years of age or older.

I lost my CDC Vaccination Card. Is there a way to get a replacement card?

If you need a replacement CDC Vaccination Card, E-mail your request with your name, date-of-birth, phone number and mailing address to covid19replacementcard@hawaiipacifichealth.org. A representative will contact you if further clarification is required.

I have never received health services from HPH. Can I still sign up to get a vaccination at HPH?

If you are in the eligible population for the COVID-19 vaccine, you can make an appointment online at HawaiiPacificHealth.org/COVID19Vaccine.

Who can I talk to if I have additional questions about the vaccine?

The Department of Health call center can be reached at 808-586-8332. It is available Monday to Friday from 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. They also have a website for vaccine questions at HawaiiCOVID19.com/Vaccine or you can email them at doh.imb.vaxcc@doh.hawaii.gov.

COVID-19 Vaccine Third Dose Questions

What is the CDC Guidance on Who Needs a Third COVID-19 Shot?

Currently, the CDC is recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised people receive an additional dose of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine, which is the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. This includes people who have:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood.
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system.
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system.
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome).
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection.
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response.


Individuals will not be required to provide proof of a medical condition to get the third dose, but will be asked to attest to their condition.

People should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

How long after getting my initial COVID-19 mRNA vaccines can I get an additional dose?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the additional dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine be administered at least four weeks (28 days) after a second dose of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.

Can you mix and match the vaccines?

For people who received either Pfizer or Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine series, a third dose of the same mRNA vaccine should be used. A person should not receive more than three mRNA vaccine doses. If the mRNA vaccine product given for the first two doses is not available or is unknown, either mRNA COVID-19 vaccine product may be administered.

What should immunocompromised people who received the Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine do?

The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) recent Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) amendment only applies to mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, as does CDC’s recommendation.

Emerging data have demonstrated that immunocompromised people who have low or no protection following two doses of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines may have an improved response after an additional dose of the same vaccine. There is not enough data at this time to determine whether immunocompromised people who received the Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine also have an improved antibody response following an additional dose of the same vaccine.

What are the benefits of people receiving an additional vaccine dose?

The third dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine is recommended for people with various conditions causing immune compromise. There is concern that the initial two doses of vaccine may not have provided adequate immune response. The third dose may be helpful to boost response.

What are the risks of vaccinating individuals with an additional dose?

There is limited information about the risks of receiving an additional dose of vaccine, and the safety, efficacy, and benefit of additional doses of COVID-19 vaccine in immunocompromised people continues to be evaluated. So far, reactions reported after the third mRNA dose were similar to that of the two-dose series: fatigue and pain at injection site were the most commonly reported side effects, and overall, most symptoms were mild to moderate. However, as with the two-dose series, serious side effects are rare, but may occur.

Vaccine Safety Questions

Why should I be vaccinated for COVID-19?

Scientific evidence indicates that getting a COVID-19 vaccine can prevent you from getting seriously ill from COVID-19. It can also help protect people around you, particularly those at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

How do we know that these vaccines are safe when they are so new?

COVID-19 vaccines were tested in large clinical trials to make sure they meet safety standards. The vaccines were developed more quickly than ever before, but the science needed to accomplish this has been built up over many years to be ready for just this kind of situation and to respond to the need. Over 40,000 people participated in these trials to study how the COVID-19 vaccines offer protection to people of different ages, races, and ethnicities, as well as those with different medical conditions.

As more people get vaccinated, safety monitoring will continue. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has an independent group of experts that reviews all the safety data as it comes in and provides regular safety updates. If a safety issue is detected, immediate action will take place to determine if the issue is related to the COVID-19 vaccine and determine the best course of action.

I hear that the vaccine can make me sick. Is that true?

Some people may experience side effects that include pain and swelling at the injection site, headache, fever, muscle aches and being very tired. These side effects may start within a few hours after you receive the shot and be mostly gone by about 36 hours after the shot.

It is important to know that fever is not dangerous and actually helps your body’s immune system react to something identified as foreign (in this case the vaccine). Many adults rarely experience fever, so it is common to become worried about something that doesn’t happen often. We recommend using acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) as needed to keep yourself more comfortable while waiting for the fever to pass. It is also a good idea to make sure you are drinking plenty of fluids because you may lose more body fluids while you are feverish.

Cough, shortness of breath, runny nose or loss of taste/smell are not consistent with post-vaccination symptoms.

Can I catch COVID-19 from the vaccine?

No. None of the vaccines use any live COVID-19 virus or COVID-19 virus particles that can cause someone to catch COVID-19.

Is there anyone who should not get the vaccine?

You cannot receive the COVID-19 vaccines if you have a history of the following:

  • Severe allergic reaction (e.g. anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a component of the COVID-19 vaccine
  • Immediate allergic reaction of any severity to a previous dose or known (diagnosed) allergy to a component of the vaccine
    • Polyethylene glycol (PEG) - specific for Pfizer and Moderna mRNA vaccines

While the vaccine has not been well studied in pregnant and breastfeeding/lactating women, it has been received safely by women who are pregnant or breast feeding. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, you should discuss whether to receive the vaccine with your personal physician. The discussion should include your risk of exposure to COVID-19 versus your level of concern regarding the unknowns of the vaccine.

Can I receive the vaccine if I am on immunosuppressive medications/therapies or on biologic treatments?

There is no data currently available to establish safety and efficacy of vaccine in these groups, who may be at increased risk for severe COVID-19 disease. These individuals may receive the vaccine unless otherwise contraindicated if they choose to do so after discussion with their personal physicians.

I already had COVID-19. Is it recommended that I get the vaccine?

People who have been sick with COVID-19 and who have recovered are unlikely to be able to catch it again for at least 90 days, so it is recommended that you not be immunized soon after you recover from COVID-19.

Those who tested positive but showed no symptoms may not have created a strong immune response and should be immunized when the vaccine is available.

Can anyone get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Hawaii Pacific Health is following the state’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan and federal government mandates for distribution of the vaccine to priority groups based on their risk of exposure. We started with Phase 1a of the plan, which includes health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities. We are currently vaccinating Oahu residents who are 12 and older. For appointments at our Kapiolani Medical Center for Women & Children Vaccine Clinic, minors ages 12 to 17 years old must be accompanied to their appointment by a parent or guardian. For appointments at our mobile vaccine clinic locations at Oahu schools, parents or guardians of students ages 12 to 17 who will not be accompanying students for their scheduled appointment must complete the Department of Education vaccination consent form available on the HPH scheduling webpage and have their child bring it with them to their appointment.

Should children get the vaccine?

The Pfizer vaccine has been made available to children ages 12 to 17 years old. It is recommended that children ages 12 years and older be vaccinated against COVID-19.

Which is the best vaccine to receive?

The best vaccine to receive is the COVID-19 vaccine that is available to you. The reasons for this are listed below.

All authorized vaccines; i.e., Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson:

  • Are 100% effective in preventing death related to COVID-19
  • Are all highly effective (over 89%) against hospitalizations due to COVID-19
  • Have similar potential for experiencing symptoms after vaccination
  • Can reduce infectiousness of COVID-19 to other people because antibodies prevent the virus from replicating enough to spread infection

Protective immunity is a full two weeks after the 2nd dose for Pfizer and Moderna, and a full two weeks after the 1st dose of Johnson & Johnson. Two shots are needed for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines to attain full immunity, whereas only one shot is required for Johnson & Johnson.

Can I choose which vaccine I will receive?

Hawaii Pacific Health generally provides the Pfizer vaccine. On days when we offer more than one vaccine, you will have a choice of which one you would like to receive.

Vaccination Process Questions

What is the cost to receive the COVID-19 vaccine?

The vaccines are being provided for free, but there may be an administrative fee to cover the cost of setting up vaccination clinics and giving the shots. Most insurance providers (including Medicare and Medicaid) will cover these fees.

How many doses does the vaccine require?

Nearly all COVID-19 vaccines being studied in the United States require two shots. The first shot starts building protection, but everyone has to come back a few weeks later for the second one to get the most protection the vaccine can offer.

Once I have received two doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, do I still have to worry about catching COVID-19? How long will the protection last after vaccination?

The studies that have been done prior to releasing the vaccines all suggest that a very high level of protection is expected, but there has not been enough time to know how long that protection will last. Studies will be ongoing. It is recommended that we continue the measures known to reduce risk of becoming infected with COVID-19: hand hygiene, face covering, and social distancing.

Can I stop wearing a mask and avoiding close contact with others after I have been vaccinated?

It will be important that you still wear your mask, practice physical distancing and keep your hands clean in an effort to protect others. Even once vaccinated, there is the chance of having the COVID-19 virus in your nose and respiratory tract that could be passed on to non-vaccinated people.

How do I report it if I have a problem or bad reaction after getting a COVID-19 vaccine?

Safety is a top priority. The CDC and FDA encourage the public to report possible side effects (called adverse events) to the national Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Healthcare providers will also be required to report certain adverse events following vaccination to VAERS. They will also have to adhere to any revised safety reporting requirements according to FDA’s conditions of authorized use throughout the duration of any Emergency Use Authorization.

In addition, the CDC is implementing a new smartphone-based tool called v-safe to check in on people’s health after they receive a COVID-19 vaccine. When you receive your vaccine, you should also receive a v-safe information sheet telling you how to enroll in v-safe. If you enroll, you will receive regular text messages directing you to surveys where you can report any problems or adverse reactions you have after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine.

Additional Resources

Where can I find more information about the COVID-19 vaccine?

The New England Journal of Medicine has published an article regarding the safety and efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine. It is available online here.

The CDC website also provides extensive information on the COVID-19 vaccine, including safety, efficacy, vaccine development, recommendations and more. Visit the CDC website here.

The Hawaii Department of Health has also made information available online about the vaccine and the state’s distribution plans. Visit HawaiiCOVID19.com/Vaccine.